An Easy Explanation to Pant Break – DV Clothiers

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An Easy Explanation to Pant Break

Posted on June 22 2017

When you go to your tailor, you can ask them to let out or take in the hem of the pants. In doing so you will be able to adjust the break in your pants.  Ask for no break, half break, or a full break (a term describing the shape of your ankle openings and the length of the pants). Before doing so, it is best to wear the shoes you will most likely be wearing with the pants and to take note of whether or not you will be rolling up your pants.

No Break:

Pants with no break just barely touch the shoes or don't touch it at all. It gives off a sleek and crisp look for the pants and shows off your shoes. If you’re a shorter person, it can make you look a little taller by showing more of your ankles.

 

 

 

Half Break:

This style is also referred to as medium break. Most pants are half break in which the pants rest on top of the shoe. It covers a couple of centimeters of the top of the shoe. This is the safest look to go for and is the most conservative.

 

 

Full Break:

Generally, I wouldn’t suggest you to do a full break unless your pants are meant to be very casual. A full break is when your pants fully rest over the top of your shoes and you can’t see your socks or the top opening of the shoe. Men who are tall (above 6 ft) can benefit from looking a bit shorter with a full break. However, it can be seen as being sloppy because it causes your pants to bunch up at the bottom. If you want to pull off a full break look, it is best to have pants holes that are really wide to prevent it from bunching.

 

 

Last Words

And there you have it! That's what pants break is. When you are bringing your pants to the tailor it is important know that there are also limitations to how much they can lengthen or shorten your pants depending on how much fabric there is. At the end of the day, if you have pants that are a bit too long, you can always pin roll them up.

What type of break do you usually use and why? Let us know in the comments down below or by sharing this article with your friends!

 

 

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